Check yourself - Web developer self-evaluation

I've been thinking a lot about inexperienced (junior, if you must) web developers and just how much there is to learn about programming in general but the web in particular. You often hear people say that you don't need to know everything but you should have a solid foundation. Well, how do you establish a solid foundation and how do you know if you have one? How do you get introduced to all the relevant terminology and how do you find out what you haven't learned yet?

I've created a tool that can help with this: Web Development - Self-evaluation. Fill it out, the data is sent nowhere aside from your client. You evaluate yourself, you change your answers as you learn. It could be pretty neat for learners and mentors/coaches/teachers alike.

It is still early days, right now it can give you an overview of areas you might want to get familiar with. I intend to add some actual information and instruction to it shortly but I wanted to get it out there since I think just the checklist is useful. It is not incredibly mobile-friendly at this point.

This doesn't really replace any other learning process. I just believe a tool like this can be useful to inform a learner or a teacher about what the learner actually needs to know better and where they feel more confident.

Very curious about your thoughts I'm available at lars@underjord.io and occasionally on Twitter where I'm @lawik.

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